Posts Tagged ‘Sexual Addiction’

End Child Sexual Abuse Foundation

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We know that there are definitional biases and gender discrepancies when it comes to recognizing,and diagnosing child abuse. But emerging research and cohort studies are lifting a twenty year embargo against discussing gender and race in re-examining both gender of perpetrators, and redefining ‘what is sexual abuse.’

For instance, it is common to examine girls for every range of possibility of sexual abuse, but no special procedures that differentiate sexual abuse of boys that was perpetrated by specifically women– like saliva analysis, or  bruising caused by objects, or a child’s exposure to other forms of female behavior that would qualify as sexual abuse.

And boys are less likely to be asked if women, girls, mothers, aunts, and/or female caretakers physically or sexually abused them.

It is also certain more often than not, that any boy who has been sexually abused by a female is less likely to self-report that fact, and by inference of all data, it is  more likely that any hospital visit will have a female caretaker present, which can intimidate self reporting of sexual and physical abuse.

It is well known that abuse victims cannot and will not expose their abuser if the abuser is standing next to them. And most abusers of children have primary custodial control of the child, meaning the child is wholly stifled at knowing how to express the abuse they have endured.

But some are asking another question: does race get in the way of boys reporting their sexual abuse at large, and specifically their sexual abuse by women? I think it does, and I am not alone–anymore..

“Child maltreatment is a significant problem within US society, and minority children have higher rates of substantiated maltreatment than do white children. However, it is unclear whether minority children are abused more frequently than whites or whether their cases are more likely to be reported. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether there are racial differences in the evaluation and Child Protective Services (CPS) reporting of young children hospitalized for fractures.”

While it is likely that historic institutionalized racism is a factor that can explain higher diagnostic success of detecting abuse in black children, it is also a possibility that observer bias ( nurses, doctors, emergency room personell) gets in the way, because white women are seldom if ever suspects–ever–in crime.

Other minority groups have their own profile issues to contend with, but beyond the biased definitional basis for ‘what is abuse,’ beyond the stereotype of male, race is a factor.

It’s not necessarily that black people abuse their children at any higher rates than white people, but rather that suspects, and suspicions of child abuse perpetrated by white people are often downplayed because of racial profiling. Whites are always “less suspect”–and white women in particular–who are the primary caretakers of children–are almost never suspected of any crimes, much less child abuse.

Yet men of all races are constantly primary suspects. They even have a gendered epithet that applies to this profile: the boogieMAN.

I suspect that it’s time to re-visit the race and child abuse question, and redefine ‘what is a suspect,’ for the sake of the children, and the future.

Note to self: put this on the white female privilege checklist.

Women’s reality is certainly something that can be re-created, if you yourself can get over the fact that ‘Tyra Banks wants YOU to be her girl!’, take yourself off of Oprah‘s mailing list, and stop sexualizing your female relatives.

Is it just me, or do pageant moms, suburban dads, and people who associate such music with kids all share something in common? I mean, even Oprah, and Tyra Banks believe girls should talk about their butts, instead of their brains.

The music is the message, and your kid—at auntie Erendira’s latest party, is the favor—and the flavor.

Caricature on "The great epidemic of porn...

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Recognizing that we [exist] are trapped in a society that circumscribes, coerces, violates and exploits our bodies as obstacles or as commodities through the co-option of our consent; and recognizing the inherent corruption and co-option of human nature due to the social compact of religious, ideological and capitalist systems, we protest.

We identify two kinds of pornographic representations of the body that the human being is forced to interact within. War porn and Sex porn—although a possible third kind of pornography exists, which is the co-opted academic debate and scholarship that seeks to rationalize, capitalize, or justify its existence through argumentation in favor of one or the other types of pornography.

We refer to this type of possible porn as “Academic porn,” the kind of dialogue that incrementalizes the urgency for liberation and human rights of one person over another person in an attempt to justify grants, fellowships, and academic notoriety, while quashing of other types of dialogues.

Definitionally, we use the term pornography derived from the freeware, open source dictionary “The Sage” to mean “creative activity (writing or pictures or films) of no literary or artistic value other than to stimulate sexual desire”. However, we suggest that all alleged pornographic imagery is literary and potentially artistic, but most importantly, discussion worthy, which is our intended act against the confines of a definitionally murderous, war based society.

In light of that definition, we believe that there is no such thing as actual sexual pornography, but rather, only debates about social control and power structures that limit the discussions about the co-option of our bodies, and the bodies of others who have been used by such a systemic, dualistic and war-pornographic culture.

We suggest a moratorium on the pursuit or prosecution of sexual pornography related crimes to limit the scope to actual perpetrators, their associates, and their accomplices, and in its place a deeper analysis of the under-explored topic of war pornography. As well we are suggesting prosecution for war crimes by nations, and leaders of individual nations that commit them, instead of shaming human beings for sexual choices, portrayals, discussions and displays.

The issues of consent, patriarchal versus matriarchal values, child versus adult sexuality, and especially homo versus hetero sexuality are constant themes that are routinely brought up in discussions of sexual pornography, and I maintain that cannot be properly analyzed in times or in places where rulers use our own and others sexual bodies and sexual shaming against us, while they and their warporn oriented minions commit the ultimate attrocities of war-pornographic murder, death, actual disease, and “otherness” perpetuation.

We rebel at complicity with their definition and adherence to the idea that human images, portrayals, and discussions of sex in all of its forms has no ‘literary or artistic value other than to stimulate sexual desire,’ because such a definition draws a false and arbitrary line between our bodies and ourselves. Sexuality is not seperable from humanity, yet neither is all sexual thought, ideology, or feeling a stimulation—it is also inseperable from our experience, imaginations, and our bodies.

So, definitionally, we take the stand that warporn is their means of primary control over our bodies, and that sexporn is merely a tool of delineating a boundary through that body—of dividing and conquering—of discerning those who will or won’t comply with the capitalist murder agenda; that defining the sexual body is in itself a primary abrogation against individual will and intention, whether sexual or not.

Additionally, we take the stand that males are primary victims of warporn, and females the primary victims of sexporn, each with their own forms of danger and suffering attached, but that warporn is the more dangerous and socially maladapted and malevolent of the two, as death, torture, rape, imprisonment, and lifelong physical and mental injury is more lasting, and acknowleging its effects is more detrimental to the health of our society.

I suggest that their war on our bodies cannot be avoided, but that we can be understood between ourselves, and eventually remove them from power. The lens which we employ is analytical from a literary sense; sociological, sexological, anthropological, psychological and evolutionary from an academic perspective.

But the war on our sexual bodies is pure propaganda, aimed at distracting us from the horror of what our nation is doing to other bodies with bombs, guns, depleted uranium, and death. I hope to help others defeat death, and live more vibrant life by recognizing how pornography affects us all.